Soybeans

Well a first for us is that we are cutting soybeans before we shell any corn.  Corn was still running in the high 20′s for moisture but the beans were dry.  So we went to the bean field.

I shot about 2 hours of video with the GoPro on a small tripod in the cab before I decided it was not the thing to use.  It kept falling over with every bump I hit.  I moved on to a Ram Mount ball where I could tie it down good and tight.  Anyway I managed to get three plus minutes of video to show how things were going on Saturday to make this video.

I will shoot some more and make another bean video and most likely a few corn videos as I work on perfecting my technique.

BTW the beans were good, averaging almost 50 bu/ac across 70 acres.  The more dust that rolled out of the combine the higher the yield was…..  seeing upwards of 70 in the real dusty places.  No dust, no beans or low bean yields in the 30′s.

The first weekend of shotgun deer season has come and gone with little fanfare it would seem.  There was very little shooting going on Friday and just a little more on Saturday and none at all on Sunday.  It will be interesting to hear or see what the final tally is for the first season.

Part 2 starts on Nov 28th and last until Sunday.

There are still several farmers trying to finish up soybean harvest in the area and that might have had some effect on the first season.  I know talking to one hunter that harvest was taking place not far from his deer stand and he said the deer were all stirred up as a result.

 

Well harvest 2012 is all but in the bag so to speak.  I have about 3 acres of beans that are still too green to cut and a frost will help them along.  I will get them when I get them at this point.  With only about 10 acres of subsoiling left to do and the tillage will be put to bed for 2012 as well.

It rained last night and that brought our rain total for 2012 up to 28 inches here at the farm.  We are still about 20 inches behind for the year with the year running out……..

Trying to sell seed and finish pulling soil samples, but it’s hard to get guys to meet this fall as most everyone wants to get done and not talk about another year right now.

The first deer season for shotgun is this coming weekend.   I think I will go hunt just to have something to do that doesn’t require thought and is pretty relaxing.

Promise to start posting more as I am getting back in the mood for the blog after a hard and stressful year.

Well corn harvest is over and if my fuzzy math is correct my whole farm average is right at 18 bushel/ac or so.  The two farms that I had hope to make a yield did but not near what was estimated.

Aflatoxin was mostly a non issue minus the best 12 acres where one load tested over 30.  It seems like the lower the yield the lower the aflatoxin and as the yield went up so did the aflatoxin.  I am still hearing some wild numbers on aflatoxin from some guys and some even have put some high numbers in a bin, why I don’t know, but they are trying to find a place to go with it I guess.  Maybe they didn’t have insurance or think that they can move it later a lot easier.  I don’t what any of it around to mess with so all mine is at the elevator.

The mood in the country is somewhat gray as everyone is mentally tired and ready for this stuff to be over.  Nerves are on edge in some places with low yields and the other stresses of a bad year.  Heard a story of a guy determined to get a semi load of corn the other day and he shelled all day even into the night and quit at 4am when he ran out of corn on that farm and still had not filled the semi.

Even bean harvest is going to be a bear with all the butter beans and green pods that a lot of fields have.  A lot of guys need a good break away from it all but it seems like it is piling on in some places.  Rain totals ranged from a few tenths to over 7 inches and those that got the big rains are even more grumpy as it has made a bad situation worse.

Wheat has already been planted and I think that is a big mistake with all the residual N that is out in these corn fields.  I even saw a field of volunteer corn that was waist high mid week.  It had grabbed the N left in the anhydrous track and was dark green.  Not good with warm temperatures and excessive amounts of N in the soil for young wheat.

We are in the discovery period for the fall harvest price option on crop insurance and everyone is hoping for a rally in prices.  One thing for sure we will be above the spring price unless there is a drastic sell off this month.

 

 

Picture from July 24, 2012 of the same corn field and same place.  Further showing deterioration of the crop.  Temps today have been over 100 deg and humidity is once again very low.

There has been some corn shelled east of here with moisture reported to be in the mid to high 20′s.  No yield report so I suspect its pretty low.  Also the number of corn fields having been bush hogged or tilled has dramatically increased as well as a few soybeans fields are being destroyed.

Here is a video interview I did with Josh Flint of Farm Progress on Thursday on  the drought here in Southern Illinois.

In the last 72 hours we have had two pop up thunderstorms, one with nickel to quarter sized hail and high winds, that  dumped in a short amount of time, a total of 1.7 inches or rain.

It is too late for the corn crop sans one 40 acre field that I planted late on May the 5th that is just now trying to tassel, but it should be more than enough moisture to get the beans I planted 10 days ago to germinate and come up.

But there is no moisture below the seed once it does come up………and we have all of July and August, typically our dry and hot period of the year, to go.

Holding out hope that we have a bean crop of some type………….

I planted my first soybeans of 2012 yesterday and into last night.  Got 80 acres planted, no tilled into corn stalks.  We got 0.25 inch of rain on Monday and that softened up the very hard soil surface enough to get the drill in the ground.

There was some moisture down about 2 inches deep.  I hope its enough and it holds long enough to get the beans up.

I was very glad to have auto-steer last night, as without it I doubt that I could have got done.  I was very hard to see even in the light.

Saturday we loaded up in the truck and struck out for Bloomington, IL to pick up an item I had purchased.  We drove up I -57 through Effingham, Mattoon, Champaign then took I-74 over to Bloomington.  Our return trip was down I-55 to  Lincoln, Springfield, Litchfield to Rt-4 at Lebanon then I-64 back to Mt Vernon and  home.

All I can say is wow, this crop is in serious trouble.  Outside of a few pockets of good looking corn, one near Effingham, Bloomington and Lincoln, the whole route looked drought stressed.  Very drought stressed and in some places stands showed the effect of dry soils at planting, especially on the soybeans.

Plus there were areas that looked N deficient as well as areas that were fired.

On a scale of 1-10 with 10 being “good” (not even close to normal or excellent) and 1 being “near dead” I would give my my corn crop a rating of 3.  Overall I give the crop we saw from the windshield a 4 with some three pockets of 7 and an equal number rated at a 2 with one area of 1.

Most of the crop is a 4 or a 5, meaning its in the poorer end of “fair” looking.

All of  the corn we saw was twisted up.  It was just greener in some places than others………..

Got done harvesting wheat yesterday.  Yields were exceptional in one field and average in another.  In a normal year it would have been reversed but the good wheat ground ran out of water with the drought this year and the low or flat ground put on a show.

I have yet to plant a soybean…………….no moisture.

Well after two attempts in the middle of a drought, we got “rained out” of cutting wheat.  We got a “shower” of 0.07 that made the wheat jump up two points in moisture and made it cut tough. So everything is back in the barn waiting on the next rain event and what we will do…………..

A quick review of the rain totals collected by my weather stations show that in the month of April I have had 2.04 inches of rain here at HQ.  For May as of this morning, with a “significant rain event almost a guarantee” (statement by local weather guesser), we have had 0.21 inch of rain.  YTD its 9.67.

The big April rain total came mostly out of three big rains on the 4th, 13 and 16th.  Each rain was a total of 0.5 inch.

It will take a significant rain event to get the moisture to meet.

On news of my soybean crop, which is not planted, as in zero or none, I am still waiting for my seed production beans to get from South America to here.  Like it matters now, no moisture is no reason to plant.  I just about broke the blade on  my pocket knife trying to dig for moisture yesterday.  Plus the weeds are about to take the field for the third time. I am running out of options on what to spray to control the weeds……….

I got done sidedressing the last two fields of corn with anhydrous today.  That means other than one last shot of post chemicals tomorrow, the corn crop is now on its own.

Now my focus shifts to wheat cutting which will happen next week………

And then I hope by the 8 of June (first it was the 1st of May then May 15 and then June 1) my parent seed will be here and I can start planting some soybeans.

In the meantime, we are bone dry, low humidity, windy and getting hot.  More like August weather than May.  The last real rain I had was about April 13.

Ready for a few days off……..

Well I have 45 acres or so of anhydrous left to sidedress when the corn gets a little bigger.  Other than that it is sit back and wait on my seed beans.  Yep sitting and waiting on my parent seed.  Seems they are having a time clearing customs.

Wheat harvest is approaching fast.  I think it will cut about the first of June.  This will be the earliest wheat harvest I can ever imagine.  I need to start getting bins ready while it is still cool.

Well, after sitting and waiting on the big rains to come, we only got a lot of thunder and 0.17 inch or rain.

So I planted corn yesterday afternoon.  We got our Pioneer PK plot done and only like 11 acres of corn at this point.

Then its time for beans…………

I guess we can let the cat out of the bag now and make the first of two major announcments that I alluded to earlier in January of some changes here on the farm.

Not only is this  a shed we are building, but it will also be a warehouse for Pioneer Seed.  Robertson Farms is now officially a Pioneer seed dealer.  We will be servicing farmers mostly in the western part of Franklin Co.  It is a natural fit for us.  We have enjoyed a long and productive relationship with Pioneer as a seed customer and seed grower, mainly because I have felt that their agronomy and sales staff have always had my success at heart when offering me products and services.  So when the opportunity presented itself last fall we began the process to become dealers for Pioneer.  We have a lot to learn but are eager and ready for the challenge!

The end of day 5 on the new shed…………….now we are ready for metal!  The nice sunny days have allowed for quick progress, but the bottom has fallen out of the ground around the site. We had to pull their forklifts and tellehandler out today.  The telehandler  was setting on the frame with the last truss suspended in the air………fun!

 

 

Meanwhile, while the last truss was going up, we spotted smoke accross the field and found that our neighbors old barn was on fire.  By the time we got over there the major part of the black smoke was gone but the flames were still going as high as the silo tops!


The old barn has been a land mark on Rt 14 east of Benton and the silos are also the site where the original farm owner killed himself back in the 40′s or 50′s…………more on that later………

Current Farm Weather

UPDATES!

Did a theme update but some features may not be working correctly, please report any issues I have not found. Thanks!

TWITTER

Categories