Monthly Archives: July 2012

Picture from July 24, 2012 of the same corn field and same place.  Further showing deterioration of the crop.  Temps today have been over 100 deg and humidity is once again very low.

There has been some corn shelled east of here with moisture reported to be in the mid to high 20′s.  No yield report so I suspect its pretty low.  Also the number of corn fields having been bush hogged or tilled has dramatically increased as well as a few soybeans fields are being destroyed.

Been slow posting….but what has there been to post about?  I mean, I can talk about the drought, but we here at ground zero are all but toast at this point and I am to the point I couldn’t care less.

Anyway……

I have been on the road off and on for the last two weeks and will be doing so again starting next week and have made some notes while driving.  I will try to do a meeting comment post in the next night or two, but for right now the driving part is what has my attention.

So here are some observations from last week or so on the road to meetings etc:

1) No one turns a corner anymore, they cut the corner. I have now started pulling all the way up to and on the white line to make people turn a corner.

2) Turn signals are optional except for old lady’s with blue hair who keep them on for miles and miles and miles.

3) I have disconnected my Garmin and have gone back to paper maps and a compass. I have yet to get lost with it vs. the GPS.

4) White or yellow parking lines in parking lots seem to be optional for young girl/women drivers.

5) Speed limits are for sissy’s and are only a suggestion and not followed.

There are more……..but these are the ones that are ever present when I am on anything but a country road the last few weeks.

Well I did it last night. I got brave enough or mad enough to walk into some of the worst looking corn I have.  The same field the Farm Progress video was shot in.

Here are the results:  5 random ears pulled from 17.5 ft of row.  That is representing 1/1000 of an acre, a representative sample in the ag world.

A picture is worth a thousand words they say.  Well this one screams those words in a high pitch as well.

I will say that better than 65% of my corn fields looks like this, 20% may look as good as the photo I posted in the blog post before this one and the last 15 % never put out an ear.

Been on the road to meetings the last few days, will post an update on some things I learned later tomorrow.

 

Today while loading some wheat I went out into one of my corn fields to look around.  I didn’t really want to, but the curiosity was getting to me.  Things were as I expected them to be, or maybe even worse.

Here is a picture some corn from the historically best spot in one of the highest yielding corn fields on my farm.   Noticed I said one of the best fields, and historically best, or highest yielding spot in that field.  This is not an average field or average ears from this field.  THIS IS THE BEST.

In a “normal” year I would expect to see 180-210+ corn yields in this area of this particular field.  In a normal year, this field would yield in the 150-160 range.

The quarter and nickel are for size/comparative purposes.

If you look very closely you can see that these plants set some big ears to start with.  Most were in the 18 round to 45 long when you count potential grains.  The best ear pictured was 18 round and 14 long but you can see by the seed size that they are not much bigger than popcorn.  Very shallow grains.

If they finish out and don’t shrink back, I really wonder how I am going to shell them.  I mean the whole ear isn’t much bigger around than the corn stalk at this point.  Setting the corn head to get these ears will be a nightmare.

Still is is better than most of the corn, which either didn’t even set an ear or didn’t pollinate.

Here is a video interview I did with Josh Flint of Farm Progress on Thursday on  the drought here in Southern Illinois.

Its hot.

How hot is it?

Well on the 4th of July this is how hot it was around Robertson Farms at 2:20 pm:

Air Temp 99.6.

Heat Index 109.

Grass in yard, full sun 130.

Grass under shade tree 89.

Wheat stubble on surface in wheat field 150. (is it no wonder where the DC Soybeans came up that they have fried and died?)

Soil under wheat straw in field 98.

I want to try and get some bear soil temperatures tomorrow in the corn field that I have been taking the pictures of.  That should be interesting.  Heat index today here at the farm hit 113.

Love this clip from the Andy Griffith show.  I never liked the color episodes for some reason.  Barney is a bigger kid than Opie and his gang………

Happy 4th of July!

In the last 72 hours we have had two pop up thunderstorms, one with nickel to quarter sized hail and high winds, that  dumped in a short amount of time, a total of 1.7 inches or rain.

It is too late for the corn crop sans one 40 acre field that I planted late on May the 5th that is just now trying to tassel, but it should be more than enough moisture to get the beans I planted 10 days ago to germinate and come up.

But there is no moisture below the seed once it does come up………and we have all of July and August, typically our dry and hot period of the year, to go.

Holding out hope that we have a bean crop of some type………….

Here are some time lapse photos of one of my corn fields showing how we went from one of the best looking corn crops ever to a complete disaster in less than a month.

Heat index temps have been over 110 this last week and they predict another week of triple digit temps.  Soil surface temps are over 130 during the heat of the day.

This corn was planted on April 13.  Rain fall from April 16 to July 1 was 0.75 inches with 0.9 coming on the night of July 1.

Picture taken June 5, 2012

Pictures taken June 16, 2012

 

 

Pictures taken July 2, 2012

 

Current Farm Weather

UPDATES!

Did a theme update but some features may not be working correctly, please report any issues I have not found. Thanks!

TWITTER

Categories